Aug 08, 2020  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog (Under Construction) 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog (Under Construction)

Academic Honesty and Dishonesty


Back to Academic Policies  

I.   Academic Integrity

A. Honor Code Pledge

“In keeping with Anderson University’s ethical standards of academic integrity and institutional values guided by its Christian mission, on my honor I pledge that I have not given, received, and/or witnessed any unauthorized assistance on this work.”

B. Statement of the Honor Code

Students and faculty at Anderson University are expected to conduct themselves with integrity and to be honest and forthright in their academic endeavors. Just as academic honesty is vitally important to the value of a college education, academic dishonesty is a serious offense because it diminishes the quality of academic scholarship and defrauds other students, faculty, the institution, and society. Additionally, academic dishonesty by students and faculty undermines the efforts of those who may eventually depend upon our knowledge and integrity.

By enrolling at Anderson University, students agree to uphold the standards of academic honesty and integrity described in Anderson University’s Catalog. Students commit to refrain from all forms of academic dishonesty and, by their example, promote the ideals of honesty, responsibility, trust, fairness, and respect that are central to Anderson University’s mission and values.

C. Implementation

The Honor Code Pledge (I.A.) and the Statement of the Honor Code (I.B.) should be included in every AU Syllabus and imbedded in AU’s Learning Management System for each seated and online course.

Both the LMS and the syllabus should also contain the statement:

“The complete Academic Integrity Policy can be found in the AU Catalog.”

Faculty members may also include the Honor Code Pledge on assessments and course materials.

D. Assumptions of the Commitments and Behaviors of Community Members

  1. Anderson University encourages the imposition of strict penalties for academic dishonesty and does so in order to protect the integrity of the grading system and to affirm the importance of honesty, integrity, and accountability in the campus community.

  2. A concern for the whole person, as is inherent in a Christian approach to higher education, and as espoused by the University, is foundational to its educational philosophy and recognizes academic dishonesty as the antithesis of this philosophy.

  3. Dishonesty in academic matters deceives and threatens not only the individual institution of higher education but also the larger society.

  4. Students and faculty alike become concerned, alarmed, and justifiably outraged by acts of academic dishonesty and other forms of academic misconduct.

  5. Apparent tolerance of academic dishonesty may encourage cheating, plagiarism, and fraud.

  6. Lack of concern for and inattention to the issue of academic dishonesty suggests that the values of integrity and honesty are not important and therefore will not be encouraged. With the exception of item II.A.6. Unintentional Incorrect Citation below, all forms of Academic Honesty should be reported.

  7. Academic dishonesty, in any form, corrupts the essential process by which knowledge is advanced.

  8. Standardization of the university’s policy addressing academic dishonesty and the expectation that all students and instructors will adhere to it will ensure equity, justice, and fairness in academic matters related to academic honesty and dishonesty.

II. Definitions

It should be assumed that improper and/or illegal uses of information technology, including the internet and its sources, fall within the forms of academic dishonesty cited below.

The term “examination” includes all materials that are “formal written, spoken or practical test[s]” that determine students’ knowledge and understanding of a subject area (Oxford Dictionaries) (e.g., examinations, tests, quizzes, music juries).

A. Plagiarism:

The presentation of someone else’s words, ideas, or data as one’s own work. When a student submits work for credit that includes the words, ideas, or data belonging to or produced by others, the source of that information must be acknowledged through complete, accurate, and discipline-specific documentation. By placing his/her name on work submitted for credit, the student certifies the originality of all work not otherwise identified by appropriate acknowledgements. Students can avoid being charged with plagiarism if there is an acknowledgement of indebtedness when

  • quoting a source’s actual words;

  • using other sources’ ideas, opinions, or theories, even paraphrased;

  • borrowing facts, statistics, or other illustrative materials, unless the information is common knowledge.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  1. Complete Direct Plagiarism: taking another person’s complete document and submitting it as one’s own original work, without appropriate acknowledgement;

  2. Self-Plagiarism or Copying One’s Own Work: reusing work from another assignment which already has or will receive credit, without permission of the instructor. In academia, students are expected to produce original work that demonstrates their intellectual development;

  3. Data Fabrication and Falsification: intentionally inventing or creating false data or research to support a claim. Falsification occurs when a writer changes or omits data to alter the impression of the reader;

  4. Partial Direct Plagiarism: copying word-for-word sections of text from another writer without attributing the work as determined by the writer’s discipline-specific documentation conventions (e.g., MLA, APA, Turabian);

  5. Paraphrased Plagiarism: intentionally taking information from another source and making only minor changes to the wording and sentence structure;

  6. Unintentionally Incorrect Citation: inaccurate, incomplete, and/or omitted citations; improper paraphrasing; and/or the incorrect use of quotation marks. This type of plagiarism may arise from lack of knowledge or understanding of discipline-specific documentation conventions.

B. Fabrication:

The intentional use of invented information or the falsification of research or other findings with the intent to deceive.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  1. Citation of information not taken from the source indicated;

  2. Listing sources in a bibliography not used in the academic exercise, unless directed by the instructor to list references consulted even if not cited;

  3. Inventing data or source information for research or other academic work;

  4. Submitting as one’s own work any academic exercise (e.g., written work, electronic document, sculpture, etc.) prepared totally or in part by another, including purchased work;

  5. Taking a test for someone else or permitting someone else to take an examination in one’s place.

C. Cheating:

An act of deception by which a student misrepresents or attempts to misrepresent that he/she has mastered information on an academic exercise that he/she has not mastered.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  1. Copying from another student’s examination;

  2. Allowing another student to copy from an examination;

  3. Sharing examination content with others, verbally, in writing, or via visual medium or recording;

  4. Allowing another to complete, partially or entirely, any work to be submitted for a grade;

  5. Posting, accessing, or using work from another student made available on unapproved websites or digital platforms;

  6. Using the course textbook or other material such as a notebook brought to a class meeting but not authorized for use during an examination;

  7. Collaborating during an examination with any other person by providing or receiving information without authorization;

  8. Using unauthorized prepared materials during an examination (e.g., formula lists, notes written on the student’s clothing, etc.);

  9. Using electronic devices of any type to access any of the above information or facilitate the above communications.

D. Academic Misconduct:

The intentional violation of Anderson University policies by tampering with grades or taking part in obtaining or distributing any part of an administered or unadministered examination or other restricted educational materials, whether from Anderson University or other institutions.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  1. Destroying or defacing academic property or materials;

  2. Removing or possessing library materials, examinations, software, etc., without permission;

  3. Stealing, buying, photographing, recording, or otherwise obtaining all or part of an administered or unadministered examination or any other material produced by faculty;

  4. Selling, sharing, or giving away all or part of an administered or unadministered examination including answers to an unadministered examination;

  5. Bribing any other person to obtain an administered or unadministered examination or any information about an examination;

  6. Entering a building or office for the purpose of obtaining an administered or unadministered examination;

  7. Entering a building or office for the purpose of changing a grade in a grade book on an examination or other work for which a grade is given;

  8. Changing, altering, or being an accessory to the changing and/or altering of a grade in a grade book; Learning Management System; on an examination or other work; a “change of grade” form; or other official academic records of the university which relate to grades;

  9. Granting and/or posting a grade that is not earned;

  10. Submitting a false excuse for absences;

  11. Possessing another’s academic work or materials without that individual’s permission.

E. Misrepresentation of Identity:

The intentional use of someone else’s identity, or reliance on someone else to falsely establish attendance or participation in a curricular or co-curricular degree requirement.

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  1. Attending class for another individual, signing for another to record attendance, or claiming attendance for another who is not present;

  2. Asking another individual to sign for or respond as present for another to record attendance, when the student is not present;

  3. Submitting someone else’s ID, digital device, or app to be scanned to record attendance or participation at a curricular or co-curricular event they did not attend;

  4. Asking another individual to submit a student’s ID, digital device, or app to be scanned to record attendance or participation at a curricular or co-curricular event the student did not attend;

  5. Submitting another individual’s documented excuse for absences.

III. Procedures

Individual faculty members have the responsibility for determining the action, within the guidelines provided below, to be taken in cases of academic dishonesty by students enrolled in their courses. Acts of academic dishonesty are never to be ignored or overlooked for any reason. Once detected by the faculty member, circumstances relating to an alleged or confirmed violation of academic honesty must be communicated to the Office of the Provost.

A. Documentation Process:

When, in the opinion of an instructor, a student has committed an act of academic dishonesty, the following procedure must be followed:

  1. The instructor will complete the Academic Honesty Infraction form to document any alleged violation. The form will be signed and dated by the instructor. Copies of any additional documentation or evidence may be attached. If more than one student is involved in the alleged violation, a separate form will be used for each student and each case will proceed separately and confidentially.

  2. The instructor will request a face-to-face or virtual meeting or will use the university’s email or LMS to notify the student of the allegation and discuss the situation. At this point, the instructor will share a copy of the completed Academic Honesty Infraction form with the student.

  3. The student may respond to the instructor’s charge verbally, in person, or, via above media, remotely. At this point, the student must use the Academic Honesty Infraction form to deny the allegation, accept full responsibility, or accept partial responsibility. The form will be signed and dated by the student and must be returned to the instructor within five (5) business days of receiving it. The student may also use the form to indicate submission of supplemental information for the instructor’s consideration. If the student wishes to submit supplemental information, it must also be provided within five (5) business days of receiving the Academic Honesty Infraction form. If the form is not returned to the instructor within five (5) business days, it will be assumed that student is accepting full responsibility.

  4. After discussing the alleged infraction with the student and, if applicable, considering any supplemental information provided by the student, the instructor will report a determination of student responsibility on the Academic Honesty Infraction form. The instructor may find the student to be fully responsible for all violations, responsible for only some violations (to be listed on the form), or not responsible for any violations. The form will be signed and dated again by the instructor, and a copy will be shared with the student within five (5) business days of receiving the student’s response on the form and any supplemental information.

  5. The instructor will enter the appropriate related grade penalties in the course gradebook, and, if necessary, submit a final grade of “F” for the course.

  6. At this point, the instructor will also share a copy of the form describing the final determination and penalties with the Office of the Provost, where it will be kept on file. Once an allegation has been initiated, the completed form must be submitted to the Office of the Provost, regardless of the instructor’s final determination of whether or not the student is fully, partially, or not responsible for the alleged infraction.

Note: Reporting unintentionally incorrect citations as an instance of Academic Dishonesty is at the discretion of the instructor (See 2.A.6.).

B. Penalties for an Infraction Within a Single Course

Penalties for various types of Plagiarism:

  1. Complete Direct Plagiarism, or

  2. Self-Plagiarism or Copying One’s Own Work (without permission of the instructor), or

  3. Data Fabrication and Falsification: The maximum penalty of a grade of “0” (zero, no credit) for the assignment is suggested.

  4. Partial Direct Plagiarism,

  5. Paraphrased Plagiarism,

  6. Unintentionally Incorrect Citation: A lesser penalty (point or letter grade deduction) may be administered. In lieu of any penalty, students may receive additional instruction and/or be allowed to correct their work.

Note: Reporting unintentionally incorrect citations (type 6) as an instance of academic dishonesty is at the discretion of the instructor. Intentionally inaccurate, incomplete, and/or omitted citations should be reported. When reported, such instances will be recorded as an offense in the Academic Dishonesty Database.

Penalties* for all other types of academic dishonesty, including, but not limited to Fabrication, Cheating, Academic Misconduct, Misrepresentation of Identity:

  1. A student guilty of a first offense of academic dishonesty within a course will receive as a maximum penalty a grade of “0” (zero, no credit) for the assignment or assessment. Lesser penalties will be left to the discretion of the instructor.

  2. A student guilty of a second offense of academic dishonesty within the same course will receive as an automatic penalty a grade of “0” (zero, no credit) for the assignment or assessment. 

  3. A student guilty of a third offense of academic dishonesty within the same course will receive an “F” as the final grade for the course. 

*More significant penalties for instances of intentional academic dishonesty in graduate programs may be administered by faculty of record in graduate courses, as outlined in the Graduate Catalog or Graduate Program Handbooks.

C. Academic Honesty Database and Penalties for Repeated Infractions within a Single Course or Subsequent Courses

A copy of any Academic Honesty Infraction form describing the final determination and penalties will be kept on file within the Office of the Provost.

Serious or repeated infractions may incur more severe penalties from the Office of the Provost.

  1. A student guilty of a first offense of academic dishonesty will receive a written warning and notice that a record of the infraction has been added to the Academic Dishonesty Database maintained by the Office of the Provost and a reminder that any subsequent infractions will also be placed on file. A student guilty of a first offense will generally not receive additional penalties from the Office of the Provost beyond those which are determined by the instructor. However, depending upon the severity, breadth, and intent of the infraction additional penalties may be administered at the discretion of the Office of the Provost.

  2. A student guilty of a second offense of academic dishonesty, in addition to penalties determined by the instructor, will receive a written warning and must complete a written or online remediation module intended to educate the student about academic dishonesty. Failure to complete this educational component will lead to the student being placed on Academic Integrity Probation for the following academic term or semester of enrollment.

  3. A student guilty of a third offense of academic dishonesty, in addition to penalties determined by the instructor, will be placed on Academic Integrity Probation by the Office of the Provost for the following academic term or semester of enrollment. Students must also complete a written or online remediation module intended to educate the student about academic dishonesty. Failure to complete this educational component will lead to the student being placed on Academic Integrity Suspension. Students who are found to have committed additional acts of academic dishonesty while on probation will be placed on Academic Integrity Suspension.

  4. A student guilty of a fourth offense of academic dishonesty, in addition to penalties determined by the instructor, will be placed on Academic Integrity Suspension by the Office of the Provost for the following academic term or semester of enrollment.

  5. A student guilty of a fifth offense of academic dishonesty, in addition to penalties determined by the instructor, will be expelled from the university by the Office of the Provost.

D. Definitions of Academic Integrity Probation and Academic Integrity Suspension

  1. Academic Integrity Probation: A written reprimand for violation of specified academic integrity policies. Probation is for a designated period of time and includes the probability of more severe sanctions if the student is found to violate any institutional regulation(s) during the probationary period. Probationary status may affect participation in student organizations and intercollegiate athletics, financial aid eligibility, and transfer to another institution.

  2. Academic Integrity Suspension: The separation of the student from the university for a definite period of time for violating academic integrity policies, after which the student may be eligible to return. Conditions for readmission may be specified.

  3. Academic Integrity Expulsion: Permanent termination of student status for violating academic integrity policies. Student is not eligible to return to Anderson University.

E. Appeals

  1. A student may appeal an instructor’s decision/penalty if

    1. the student believes there are extenuating circumstances that warrant a reconsideration of the decision;

    2. the student believes he/she has been treated unfairly or arbitrarily, or the penalty is not in keeping with this policy;

    3. the stated process for alleging, reporting, and determining responsibility and penalties was not followed. All appeals by students must be initiated within five (5) business days of being notified of the outcomes (determination of responsibility and sanctions) when receiving the completed Academic Integrity Infraction form (see III.A.4.).

  2. All student appeals must be presented in writing by the student to the individuals in the order listed:
    1. College dean (unless this is also the instructor and then the appeal goes to the Provost)

    2. Office of the Provost (only if the student wishes to appeal the dean’s decision) 

  3. If the alleged violation occurs during the final examination period of a semester, the dean will authorize the assignment of an “I” (Incomplete) grade to show incomplete work. The grade of “I” will stand until the alleged violation is resolved according to the above procedures.

At each stage of the appeal, the person to whom the appeal is presented will respond to it in writing ideally within five (5) business days, but up to ten (10) business days after receiving the appeal, with copies submitted to the student, instructor, and any other individuals who have dealt with or will deal with the case in question.

IV.  Student Responsibilities

Students can promote an environment of academic integrity by observing to the following guidelines:

  1. Discourage dishonesty among other students.

  2. Refuse to assist students who cheat.

  3. Check the course syllabus as well as the course’s learning management system for a section dealing with academic dishonesty for that course. There may be special requirements. If you cannot find a written section in the syllabus, ask the instructor what his/her expectations are.

  4. Be clear on instructor expectations regarding what is and is not permissible for collaborative assignments.

  5. Make every effort to ensure that all work submitted is original and not influenced by the ideas of others.

  6. Use a discipline-specific handbook for instruction on citing source materials. Consult with individual faculty or academic departments when in doubt.

  7. Use information technology sources as directed by professors.

  8. Do not loan your work to other students to be referenced as examples.

  9. Do not lend your work or assignments that have been evaluated to other students.

  10. Prepare thoroughly for examinations and assignments.

  11. Take the initiative to prevent other students from copying from your examination by shielding your answer sheet during examinations.

  12. Do not look in the direction of other students’ examinations during examinations.

  13. Report to your instructor any instances of academic dishonesty.

V.    Faculty Responsibilities

With the exception of item II.A.6. Unintentional Incorrect Citation, all forms of Academic Honesty should be reported.

Allowing a student accused of a violation to withdraw from or drop the course is not an appropriate action.  

Failure by an instructor or staff member to follow the procedure outlined in this policy might subject the faculty or staff member to disciplinary action, up to and including immediate termination.

Faculty members can encourage academic integrity among students by observing to the following guidelines:

  1. Include a statement in the course syllabus regarding academic honesty/dishonesty as it relates to that particular class.

  2. Discuss the issues of cheating, academic misconduct, fabrication, and plagiarism at the beginning of each semester and before examinations.

  3. Discuss the issue of plagiarism, making certain students understand discipline-specific documentation conventions for collaboration on class/team projects.

  4. Remain current with information technology sources and resources.

  5. Ensure password protection on all computer and information technology devices.

  6. Do not permit students to leave the classroom during an examination unless permitted by academic accommodations.

  7. Keep examinations in a secure location (e.g., locked desks, locked files, etc.).

  8. Do not use student workers to type, duplicate, file, or grade examinations.

  9. Have several proctors present during an examination. It is preferable that more than one be present for over thirty students. Before an examination, instruct proctors about their responsibilities.

  10. Prepare new or reorganized versions of examinations each semester.

  11. Give essay examinations instead of multiple-choice examinations, as appropriate and when class size permits, or write multiple choice questions that require analysis beyond rote memorization.

  12. Administer multiple versions of the same examination, particularly with short answer examinations.

  13. Specify before the examination whether or not students may have materials in their possession (e.g., books, notes, scrap paper, calculators, handheld computers, PDAs, cell phones, or other mobile devices). Scrap papers should be turned in with the examination so that information related to the examination may not be taken from the classroom. Supply the scrap paper as a part of the examination packet.

  14. Require students remove smart watches, fitness trackers, earbuds, and other personal digital devices unless permitted by academic accommodations.

  15. Assign seating during examinations.

  16. Leave open seats between students during an examination, if possible.

  17. Collect blue books from students before an examination to ensure they are blank and redistribute them before the examination begins.

  18. Have each student sign his/her answer sheet and record his/her Anderson University ID number.

  19. Number examinations and count the number distributed and returned.

  20. Destroy all waste copies and related materials for an examination.